The After-Matt of a Hurricane

Scorps Share how Hurricane Matthew Affected Them

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The After-Matt of a Hurricane

A tree collapsed in the road due to Hurricane Matthew.

A tree collapsed in the road due to Hurricane Matthew.

Photo Credit Trent Blanchard

A tree collapsed in the road due to Hurricane Matthew.

Photo Credit Trent Blanchard

Photo Credit Trent Blanchard

A tree collapsed in the road due to Hurricane Matthew.

Taylor Rohleen

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To some Scorps, Hurricane Matthew was merely a rainy vacation. To others, it was considered an uninvited guest that prompted quality family time. With the eye of the hurricane dwindling and sweeping 20 miles further east than anticipated, Scorps’ outlooks shifted continually throughout this natural disaster.

 

Prior to this news, Lillian Zobel (11) was startled by Matthew’s original predicted outcome. Zobel, being new to Florida, was used to the floods and tornados of Iowa, her home state. “I expected it to go away and didn’t know it would hit so many states.” She assumed a hurricane would have a similar progression to a tornado’s in that they last for 10 minutes on average. Zobel to anticipate it to dissipate, since she was given 2 days warning for Matthew, and tornado warnings are about 8 minutes before destruction. Despite Zobel’s lack of experience, her hurricane-adept neighbors informed of standard hurricane protocol. They came to a consensus to wait out the storm, given that they live mainland and were likely to have less damage.

 

Scorps who have lived in the area longer had more relaxed responses to the natural disaster. Some went on vacation, to theme parks, or surfed in the waves provoked by Matthew. Makena Rhines,10, went to Kissimmee because “[her] mom was flipping out.” Others, such as freshman Madi Versaggi stayed at home since her father is a police officer. The severity of the hurricane left the barrier island without emergency services, and a need for officers to patrol it.

 

Due to Matthew’s effects, the balance among homework and activities expanded to include hurricane clean-up. Debris is to be collected, roofs to be fixed, screens to be mended, fences to be rebuilt, and trees to be removed, and so on. Georgea Lorenzen’s (10) family was faced with “a tree [falling] on [her] sister’s house” that had recently undergone renovation. For her family and many others, reparation will become the standard after-school activity. With the inclusion of three lost school days, assignments meant to be completed in the time of the hurricane will be compacted in the upcoming weeks, will need to develop quality time management skills between schoolwork and home repairs.

 

Hurricane Matthew’s effects seemed to alarm those newer to Brevard, as opposed to those who grew up in the area, even though the last major hurricane was Hurricane Wilma in 2005– when the eldest Scorps were in elementary school. Thus, many relied off the wisdom of their relatives for insight on how Matthew would play out.