Are Students Being Taught What They Need at School?

Why We Need More Real-World Lessons

Artwork+by+Jazz+Dawkins
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Are Students Being Taught What They Need at School?

Artwork by Jazz Dawkins

Artwork by Jazz Dawkins

Photo Credit Jazz Dawkins

Artwork by Jazz Dawkins

Photo Credit Jazz Dawkins

Photo Credit Jazz Dawkins

Artwork by Jazz Dawkins

Jazzarie Dawkins

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While some may disagree, I believe that a significant amount of the material being taught in many classes is unnecessary. Less than ten percent of the time do I walk out of school knowing that everything I learned that day is going to benefit me in the near future. An exception to this might be career classes or electives such as art, chorus, band or even some language classes. It seems like core classes such as math, reading, social studies, and science become less and less practically useful  as you move into higher grade levels. Personally, I feel that we should be learning a mix of important life skills, like taxes and mortgage, while being taught basic school material.

In an interview of nineteen people conducted at Satellite High, eight students said that they felt that what they’re being taught in school is going to help them in the future. Eleven said that they felt the opposite. Three of those who agreed that what they’re being taught is necessary, however, mentioned that they are good at school. Three girls who voted no said that they didn’t know how to do their taxes, implying they’d want to learn life skills rather than learning how to dissect some poor animal in a science class or having “the mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell” embedded in their heads. While maintaining good grades may be a factor as to why some kids think everything they’re being taught will benefit them, I don’t think that kids who’ve felt the opposite necessarily have bad grades. This counters the belief that the lazy kids who are failing are the ones who complain about school the most.

Regardless, the concept of learning more life skills in school remains. Before talking to other students about writing this article, I had never heard of a 401k; however, I presume it’s important. Before ninth grade, I thought a mortgage was an initial payment and I wasn’t aware there’s a monthly payrate, like a rent. I think it is pointless, honestly, so clearly I still don’t have a distinct understanding. I still have questions about things like legalities of investing as a minor and the requirements to open a Roth IRA, if any. I’d like to think that I have all the time in the world to start thinking about these and I don’t have to worry about it for now, but since the point of school is to be prepared for college and the future, then why not teach us all these things sooner rather than later?