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Travel Ban: A Divided Argument

U.S.+citizens+gather+together+to+protest+the+rights+of+immigrants.
U.S. citizens gather together to protest the rights of immigrants.

U.S. citizens gather together to protest the rights of immigrants.

Photo Credit Pixabay

Photo Credit Pixabay

U.S. citizens gather together to protest the rights of immigrants.

Shania Campbell

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The official travel ban arrangement, established by President Donald Trump, has people across the nation discussing the rights of Muslim nations vs. the safety of U.S. citizens.

The travel ban basically doesn’t allow citizens from eight nations to enter the U.S. with most of the countries having Islam as their main religion. The countries include Iran, Somalia, Chad, Libya, Yemen, Syria, North Korea, and Venezuela. It is predicted that the travel ban will also eventually take action in Israel because of the country wanting to project its power and dominance. The effect of the travel ban on Chad, Yemen, Syria, North Korea, and Libya is that all citizens are banned from the U.S. even if they have business or tourist visas. Citizens from Venezuela with visas are required to have additional screening measures while government officials aren’t allowed into the country at all. Immigrants from Somalia are banned from entering, but as long as they are seeking tourist or business visas, citizens can enter after undergoing extra security measures. With security being increased, many U.S. citizens feel better about foreigners from more dangerous countries entering the country since the U.S. is currently fighting the War on Terror.

Based on events in the past, such as 9/11, the U.S. has become divided on this topic with many being hesitant to invite Muslims into the country while others believe the entire religion shouldn’t be blamed. Muslim families are being separated because visas in the U.S. aren’t easily obtainable or family in the U.S. can’t contact family members from the countries banned. People gather in airports or in the streets to protest that Muslims should be welcomed and that entire countries shouldn’t be discriminated against. Freshman Walker Wood agrees stating, “there is a need for the proper ability to keep terrorist organizations out of our country, but the travel ban has gone too far by excluding an entire country and limiting the Muslim religion from coming here.” Regions become divided because of discriminations against certain nations or religions which can lead to possible wars for rights and equality.

The other side of the argument is strong, though, with the protection of the U.S. as priority since countries continue to fight each other worldwide. Sophomore Jobe Galli believes “Trump did this to limit the terrorist groups from traveling in secret with immigrants coming to the U.S. in order to eventually sabotage our country.” Allowing immigrants to enter the country without a proper background check can ultimately lead to an attack against the U.S. Many people understand that the President Trump has a complete right to protect the country from possible threats because of occasions that has caused the U.S. to feel targeted by terrorist groups such as Al-Qaeda. An anonymous Senior at Satellite claims “I think it’s a good plan because our country is still trying to figure itself out, for example, [we’re assessing] our gun laws and how they should be more controlled.” This topic has ultimately become a controversial argument between protecting the country or discriminating an entire religion even though it’s a temporary ban.

It has become a topic of discussion within politics as a result of the dividing sides between protecting the U.S. and discriminating entire nations. The difficult decision is up to both the government, but activated citizens always have a choice to voice their own opinion in topics that can eventually impact their lives.

 

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About the Writer
Shania Campbell, Staff
My name is Shania Campbell and I’m in my second year as a Telstar staff member. I’m a very secretive and quiet person with just about everyone, so, if you’ve met me, don’t take it personally.
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