Crying Is Mental Health Too

January 28, 2019

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Crying is good, and there needs to be a conversation on that.

The other day in school, I was feeling extremely panicky. I texted my friend and told her to meet me in the hallway. I notified my teacher that I was going outside to get some air, and once I met my friend, she gave me a hug, and I cried in her arms. It appeared that I was over the feeling of having everything pent up inside of me.

Everyone will reach a point, or a “breaking” point if you will, where they can no longer conceal the emotions they’ve pent up and mentally put to the side. This is not mentally healthy, but rather than holding out any longer, sometimes your mind cries (hehe) for help. This is a way for your body to take over, an attempt to get yourself to listen. In my case, I recognized my emotions, but never took them into consideration, so when I didn’t allow myself to take action, my body did so for me, unfortunately and I had a long hard cry about it in the middle of the school day, but afterwards not only did I feel better, but I learned. Not every breakdown is a going to be a lesson in life, and those are the ones you need to pay attention to. Sometimes, though, you shouldn’t or don’t have to let yourself reach a breaking point to make a decision like I did, all I am trying to do is propose a rationale behind why this happens and why it can be a good thing.

Whenever I tell my friends that I feel like crying, instead of the usual, “Please don’t cry 😔”, they encourage me to let it out, and insist that sometimes “it’s okay to cry”, and according to AgingCare.com, that’s true. In their article, Go Ahead, Have a Good Cry, crying reduces manganese, “a mineral which affects mood and is found in significantly greater concentrations in tears…” Crying essentially releases the “negative energy” within you, something we all need to do.  The School of Life compares this to a “revolution”, and they’re right. This in short, is a way for you to get over yourself.

Later on that same afternoon, I started to feel much better. I always look back some time after,  and I feel different, like something within me is altered. Sometimes after or even during a breakdown, we start to wonder if this is a sane thing to do, and I can’t stress enough how okay it is. Crying is incredibly normal and human. I try to reassure myself of this by letting breakdowns act as a sort of validation, that my feelings whether happy, sad, angry, excited, are real and valid, and that’s also how I remind myself that things are going to be okay. It also helps when someone you trust, like my friend for instance, is near you to comfort you. If you take nothing else away from my experience and this article, I hope that you realize that emotions aren’t something to bottle in due to societal norms or that breaking down is abnormal.

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