16 US States Sue Trump Due to Border Wall

Donald+Trump+speaking+with+supporters+at+a+campaign+rally+at+Fountain+Park+in+Fountain+Hills%2C+Arizona.+Photo+courtesy+of+Wikimedia+Commons.
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16 US States Sue Trump Due to Border Wall

Donald Trump speaking with supporters at a campaign rally at Fountain Park in Fountain Hills, Arizona. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Donald Trump speaking with supporters at a campaign rally at Fountain Park in Fountain Hills, Arizona. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Photo Credit Gage Skidmore

Donald Trump speaking with supporters at a campaign rally at Fountain Park in Fountain Hills, Arizona. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Photo Credit Gage Skidmore

Photo Credit Gage Skidmore

Donald Trump speaking with supporters at a campaign rally at Fountain Park in Fountain Hills, Arizona. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Shania Campbell, Staff

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President Trump declared a national emergency as of February 15th to gain funds for the Mexico border wall, which led to a lawsuit by 16 US states against him.

 

The national emergency was declared after Congress refused to approve the $5.7 billion for the Mexico border wall. Trump already signed a spending bill that granted him $1.375 billion for the wall to avoid another government shutdown, but he decided to declare a national emergency in hopes to obtain the $5.7 billion sooner. He believes the national emergency would give him almost $8 billion for the wall, but the estimated cost is $23 billion to reach the 2,000-mile border.

 

The 16 states suing the president are led by California and include Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, New Jersey, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Virginia, and Michigan. State representatives filed the lawsuit February 18th because they believe Trump is doing acts that are unconstitutional and is abusing his power as president.

 

Many Americans remember the phrase that was repeated nonstop by Trump when he was running for president: “Mexico will pay for the wall.” It has been three years and Americans are now forced to pay for it when most are against building a wall in the first place. Since Trump began pushing more for this wall, more research has been done regarding how effective it will really be and if it is really worth it. Much of the research, though, concludes that it is not necessary and may cause more harm than good.

 

The national emergency is able to be terminated by Congress if both houses agree and if the President doesn’t veto their decision. Even if he does veto it, though, a supermajority vote of Congress can overturn that action.