A Farewell to Telstar

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A Farewell to Telstar

The 2018-2019 Telstar Staff.

The 2018-2019 Telstar Staff.

Photo Credit Casey Strattan

The 2018-2019 Telstar Staff.

Photo Credit Casey Strattan

Photo Credit Casey Strattan

The 2018-2019 Telstar Staff.

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“Journalism can never be silent: That is its greatest virtue and its greatest fault. It must speak, and speak immediately, while the echoes of wonder, the claims of triumph and the signs of horror are still in the air.”

— Henry Anatole Grunwald

 

The 2018-2019 school year was, for the formidable future, the Telstar’s last run. Its numbers and popularity have been dwindling, leading to its dormancy. Following is a recap of the Telstar, in the style of A Christmas Carol.

 

The Past

The Telstar was established with the founding of Satellite High School, back in 1962. Its name originated from the Telstar satellite, Brevard’s first communications satellite. Print newspapers were distributed to the student body for years. In 2016, the Telstar went digital, following the trend of digital journalism.

Another key element to the Telstar is the Cyclone, Satellite’s literary magazine. This, akin to the Telstar, has manifested in both print and digital forms. A main issue with printing was the cost: Since the arts gradually lost funding, the Telstar staff would have to fundraise hundreds, only to distribute few copies. This left an online publication to be the best option, leading to the conception of Telstar.news.

 

The Present

Perhaps you have noticed an infrequency in posting or a slow decline in membership over the years. As Satellite’s curriculum honed in on academics, enrollment in the Telstar shrunk. A full classroom turned into six students, a mere proportion of Satellite’s population. Due to the shrinking staff, the school decided to cut Telstar from its class offerings.

 

The Future

The demise of the Telstar is concurrent with the demise in the arts. Society has been led to believe that the infinite bustle of the world has no time for artistic creativity, for it has been deemed the subservient skill. In a time with a dying sense of artistic merit, we must applaud those who harness their imagination, we must appreciate their works, and we must celebrate any efforts toward a more expressive tomorrow. Though Satellite may begin its next school year without the Telstar, the pursuit of veritable journalism must not end with it.