Freshman Fear

Freshmen Express Fears about The World of High School

Seniors%2C+Chris+Mejias+and+Spencer+Boone+joke+with+a+fellow+friend+by+putting+him+in+a+trash+can%2C+portraying+freshman%27s+fears.+
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Freshman Fear

Seniors, Chris Mejias and Spencer Boone joke with a fellow friend by putting him in a trash can, portraying freshman's fears.

Seniors, Chris Mejias and Spencer Boone joke with a fellow friend by putting him in a trash can, portraying freshman's fears.

Photo Credit Taylor Rohleen

Seniors, Chris Mejias and Spencer Boone joke with a fellow friend by putting him in a trash can, portraying freshman's fears.

Photo Credit Taylor Rohleen

Photo Credit Taylor Rohleen

Seniors, Chris Mejias and Spencer Boone joke with a fellow friend by putting him in a trash can, portraying freshman's fears.

Bella Dawson and Taylor Rohleen

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The rising students of Satellite High share the fears they’ve encountered and dealt with, as they enter the school that will house the next 4 years of their lives.  

As closed, dusty textbooks and summer air morph into stacks of new notebooks and fancy mechanical pencils, rising freshmen are startled by the fact that the first day of high school looms over them. A chaotic world of over-crowded hallways and pretentious peers awaits their arrival, and will not slow down for anyone. One can agree that it is completely natural for “first day jitters” to take place, but how serious is the doubt and fear that a freshman endures each year?

Freshman Whitney Jackim shares that the scariest aspect of high school was making new friends. Jackim describes the process of finding her crowd at school as “nerve wracking.” However, almost two months into the school year, Jackim admits that she’s “made a lot of great friends” and that Satellite is “a great school.”  Teri Smith, another freshman, has a much different perspective of the social aspect of a new school. Smith describes high school as a new way to “express yourself.” Damaris Padron agrees, and shares that “everyone is a lot more chill.”

As for academic worries that have hindered many freshmen’s soul, Smith declares, “In middle school, the teachers would just tell you all the answers but not anymore. Instead, if you ask a questions, the teachers just think you’re stupid.” Whereas Jackim states that she “thought the schoolwork and homework would be hard, but it’s not as hard as [she] thought.”

James Herbert, former “bad boy” of DeLaura Middle School claims that at Satellite, he is granted a “fresh start”.

The opinions and worries that take shelter in a freshman’s mind as highschool approaches varies immensely with only one aspect in common: all fears that have been shared are conquerable.